How to interpret the indicators expressed in the form of female to male ratio (gender parity)?

For some indicators—youth unemployment rate, total unemployment rate, population with at least some secondary education and old age pension recipients, the values are expressed as female to male ratio of the original expressions of these indicators as rates or population shares. Effectively, the interpretation of these ratios should be similar to the interpretation of odds ratios.

Example: Youth unemployment rate (% of labour force, ages 15-24), female to male ratio:
A value of this ratio less than 1 indicates that the unemployment rate for young females is lower than the unemployment rate for young males. And vice versa, a value higher of 1 indicates that the unemployment rate of young females is higher than the unemployment rates of young males.

For Canada, female to male youth unemployment ratio is 0.88, meaning that the unemployment rate of young females is lower. It is about 88 percent of the unemployment rate of young males. That is, in Canada, the odds that a young unemployed person is female is 0.88 times the odds that an unemployed young person is a man. At the same time for Singapore this ratio is 1.32, meaning that the unemployment rate of young females is about 32 percent higher than of young males. That is, in Singapore, the odds that a young unemployed person is female is 1.32 times the odds that such a person is a young male.