Reports

2016
Country or Region:
Zambia
Description:

Both theoretical foundations and empirical analysis demonstrate a direct but more intricate relationship between industrialization and human development. Human development is defined as the process of expanding individual freedoms to live long, healthy and creative lives; to advance towards other goals that they have reason to value; and to engage actively in shaping equitable and sustainable development on a shared planet. Fundamental to enlarging peoples' choices is the building of human capacities – the range of things that people can do or be in life. Investing in people will enable growth and empower people, thus developing human capacities. Employment, either through self-employment or wage employment, is the primary means through which individual capabilities are used to earn income. This income can then be diversified into productive assets, including human capital. When average incomes increase, overall consumption increases, savings accelerate and investments in technological advancement, physical assets, education, and skills also expand.

An analysis of the priorities of the poor in Zambia reveals that, beyond income, individuals value a broad range of things. They require adequate food and nutrition, safe and accessible water supply, better medical services, good quality education at all levels, affordable transport services, adequate shelter, secure livelihoods and productive and satisfying jobs (Republic of Zambia, 2002; UNDP, 1996).

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Type:
National
2013
Country or Region:
Yemen
Description:

Yemen is facing a large tremendous challenges in socioeconomic, development, political, security, as well as culture integration at a time when many countries in the world notable developing countries are advancing in all sphere of life including economic advancement and cultural evolution. The path of development in Yemen has been associated with events of suffering, conflict and security, political and military unrest conditions which of course have affected the country economic and development. This situation has an impact on the development progression and caused repeated setbacks, and weakened the growth process and encumbered the national economy and society a lot of losses, and thus drain the country's resources in financing those anti-development and anti-growth processes.

Yemen continues to be categorized within the least developed countries and lowest in the level of human development as indicated by the development local and international reports. To attainment proper sustainable development path, Yemen would require to undertake vigorous reform in national budgetary structure and give much priority on education and health as this will accelerate the engine of growth and advancement of Yemeni people.

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Type:
National
2014
Country or Region:
Description:

By increasing GDP and creating new income- and employment-generation opportunities particularly for vulnerable communities–international trade can promote human development. Both trade theories and national experience point to potential pro-poor outcomes for low- and middle-income countries that specialize in the production and export of labour-intensive goods and services. UNDP’s 2005 Central Asia Human Development Report therefore called for a more pro-active approach to trade (and transport and transit) in the region. In light of new developments and trends now unfolding in the region–concerning global and regional integration, migration and remittances, and the unbundling of global value chains–this paper builds on UNDP’s 2005 report by updating the case for policies and programming that can help global and regional integration promote human development in Central Asia.

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Type:
Regional
2012
Country or Region:
Chile
Description:

2016 Awards for Excellence in Human Developing Reporting Awardee

This NHDR uses measures of subjective wellbeing (in particular ‘happiness’) to better understand “what ultimately matters” when striving for development in Chile. The report, which was extensively disseminated across the country, framed this discussion within Chilean society and it still draws attention 4 years after its publication. The findings of this report are being used by Ministry of Education in the discussion of a new national school curriculum and the Ministry of Social Development has measured life satisfaction in line with its recommendations. Its practical application is also impressive: not only is it being used in the national school curriculum, and the national statistical office is measuring life satisfaction in line with the NHDR´s recommendations.


Abstract

Today, there is a public conversation about development that is moving forward around the globe. Different actors are increasingly arguing that it is necessary to pay attention to other dimensions besides economic growth (or the traditional way of conceiving it), which implies fine–tuning goals, normative frameworks and even statistical measurements; it forces public actions to focus on “what ultimately matters” when striving for development.

In this context, the possibility of adding people’s happiness as one more development goal is ever more present in international public discussions. Countries and leaders have begun to value, as a politically relevant objective, the considerations associated to the assessment that people make about their lives. Although it is incipient, this dialogue has also started within Chilean society.

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Type:
National