Reports

2015
Country or Region:
Uganda
Description:

2016 Awards for Excellence in Human Developing Reporting Awardee

This report is about unlocking the development potential of the northern part of the country that is recovering from 20 years of violent civil war. The report shows what is possible when working in a challenging region. This report generated baseline data on the region and its human development challenges. And it has had a tangible impact, already shaping government and development partners’ policies and programming. The report has also influenced the National Poverty Reduction Strategy for the region.


Abstract

The Uganda Human Development Report 2015 (2015 UHDR) focuses on development in Northern Uganda, broadly defined as the region covered by the Peace, Recovery and Development Plan (PRDP).
The report applies one dominant notion of post conflict research - that is, restarting the engines of growth. This notion is applied to examine the abundant development opportunities, and the unique challenges associated with unlocking the economic potential of the PRDP region using the UNDP-inspired lens of human development. The underlying premise as stipulated by Amartya Sen is that development is not just about investments as we regard them (for instance infrastructure), important as they are. Nor is it about growth per se. Development is fundamentally about people and their wellbeing.

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Uganda Human Development Report 2015
Type:
National
2015
Country or Region:
Qatar
Description:

Realising Qatar National Vision 2030: The Right to Development, takes stock of progress on human development in Qatar from the perspective of the 1986 Right to Development (RtD) Declaration. It identifies national challenges and focuses on opportunities for the fuller realisation of the RtD of the Qatari and non-Qatari populations; women’s empowerment and gender equality; the rights of children, youth and older persons; the rights of people living with disabilities; participation and international cooperation. The Report aims to provoke public policy debate and raise awareness that human development and human rights are intertwined and that there can be no real development without the full enjoyment of all human rights. This Report contains a limited number of key policy recommendations for Qatar’s second National Development Strategy 2017-2022, to progress the Right to Development.

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Type:
National
2013
Country or Region:
Kenya
Description:

Climate change is globally acknowledged as one of the most significant development challenges facing humanity. There is increasing evidence that climate change is directly affecting the social, economic and human development of countries. Combating climate change therefore has become one of the key global development priorities. The effects of climate change and related disasters have the potential to adversely impact the majority of Kenyans given that about 75% of the population depends directly on land and natural resources for their livelihoods. In recent years, there has been increased attention to climate change due to its impacts on the lives of Kenyans. This has been mainly due to an increase in intensity and frequency of extreme climate events such as severe droughts and flooding. These extreme events have had negative socio-economic impacts on almost all sectors in the Kenyan society such as health, agriculture, livestock, environment, hydropower generation, and tourism. The seriousness of the problem has made it imperative for policy makers to begin to mainstream climate change in development policies and strategies. This is the motivating factor for a national human development report (NHDR) on climate change. This is the 7th NHDR produced for Kenya on the theme: “Climate Change and Human Development: Harnessing Emerging Opportunities”

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Type:
National
2014
Country or Region:
Tanzania (United Republic of)
Description:

Over the past decade, Tanzania has experienced an impressive average annual GDP growth rate of 7%. However, contrary to the widespread expectations of many, the high growth rate did not result in commensurate poverty reduction. With exception of some notable progress in a few areas such as child survival (reduction of child mortality rates) and school enrolment, improvements in the overall status of human development in Tanzania are only marginal. In fact, the country has fallen seven positions in the Global UNDP’s 2014 Human Development Index ranking. Economic growth by itself has failed to expand the ability of the majority of Tanzanians to lead the kind of lives they value.

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Type:
National